The Outer Worlds fun exploring every nook and cranny, scouring out-of-the-way locations for loot

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The premise of The Outer World begins like Mass Effect Andromeda in that you’ve been frozen in order to be transported to another galaxy as a colonist. A problem occurred and your ship has been adrift in space for the past 70 years. You are thawed out by a scientist that is working towards unfreezing the rest of your shipmates. You’ve been chosen because you are the best hope the rest of your popsicle-comrades have of becoming defrosted themselves. Thus, off you go in search of the necessary items the scientist needs to save your friends and family. Right away the off-kilter humor of The Outer Worlds hits you right in the face. Before you even go through the character creation process there are instances of dramatic build-up let down by comic relief caused by a faulty button. When you land on the first planet, there’s a moment that reminded me of The Wizard of Oz in which I crushed someone beneath my escape pod so I took their spaceship. There’s a “That’s what she said,” quip by one of my companions in the middle of me talking to a quest giver about a serious issue. The dark humor of the original Fallout is on ever-present display but without the game appearing too slapstick or macabre.



The Outer World begins like Mass Effect Andromeda in that you’ve been frozen in order to be transported to another galaxy as a colonist. A problem occurred and your ship has been adrift in space for the past 70 years. You are thawed out by a scientist that is working towards unfreezing the rest of your shipmates. You’ve been chosen because you are the best hope the rest of your popsicle-comrades have of becoming defrosted themselves. Thus, off you go in search of the necessary items the scientist needs to save your friends and family. Right away the off-kilter humor of The Outer Worlds hits you right in the face. Before you even go through the character creation process there are instances of dramatic build-up let down by comic relief caused by a faulty button. When you land on the first planet, there’s a moment that reminded me of The Wizard of Oz in which I crushed someone beneath my escape pod so I took their spaceship. There’s a “That’s what she said,” quip by one of my companions in the middle of me talking to a quest giver about a serious issue. The dark humor of the original Fallout is on ever-present display but without the game appearing too slapstick or macabre. But things are not all fun and games in the Board-run galaxy of Halcyon. The Board is a group of all the big companies in Halcyon that essentially own everyone’s life. They only care about profits, not the livelihood of their employees. As you saunter off to different colonies, you may run into situations in which you are provided opportunities to save the colonists from being under the Board’s rule. Be mindful however that situations may not be as black and white as they appear – sometimes what you may deem to be morally wrong might be the best choice in ensuring the least amount of people are killed needlessly. It’s these seemingly black-and-white choices in The Outer World that offer up the most conflicting choices I’ve encountered across any video game. When I thought I was going about the most obvious solution to solve an issue, it turned out to be the most costly choice I could have made. Despite appearing to be the most morally-righteous decision, I wound up causing more harm than good as opposed to approaching the solution more logically. There are six different attributes in The Outer Worlds, each of which affects several corresponding skills. For example, the Strength attribute affects Melee skills, Inspiration, Intimidate, Heavy Weapons, and Block skills. I found a lot of consumables that could help me increase some of these skills temporarily as well, although they usually included some kind of withdrawal effect so I hardly ever used them. Sometimes it’s worth it to quaff a bottle of booze though in order to improve your character’s charisma, but you’ll be suffering from a hangover in-game afterward. Don’t be too caught up in the min-max aspects of your skills though, at least not initially. After you’ve progressed to a certain point in the game, you gain access to a machine that will reset all of your spent stat points and perks, so you never have to feel locked into any mistakes you’ve made up until that point. Initially, I wanted to be a gun-slinging cowboy-type rogue character, like a Han Solo type. However, I fell in love with Heavy weapons like the Light Machine Gun and Grenade Launcher and I felt compelled to reset my stats to better improve my total damage and reload speeds with these weapons.

The Outer Worlds’ way of having an aim-assist function. Unlike Fallout in which you could slow down time indefinitely, choose a body-part to attack and let loose; the system in The Outer Worlds feels simultaneously like a grown-up version and trimmed-down version of the same idea. Time still slows to a crawl but there is no system in place to assist you in lining up your shots. It still plays like a first-person shooter, but you get the time to line up your shots more accurately. More than comparing it to Fallout, it might be better to consider it the same as Max Payne’s bullet-time system. I didn’t use TTD at first, preferring to play TOW much like an FPS in the vein of Borderlands. However, as I progressed through the game and enemies became more difficult to defeat, I realized the usefulness that TTD offers in order to cause status-effects on enemies. By aiming in TTD at certain body-parts, you are able to see which areas are weak and will cause critical hits. Some areas, like headshots, may cause blindness on your enemies – causing them to miss their attacks. Others can stun or immobilize enemies, which I would utilize as a crowd-control method to pick off enemies one-by-one without calling a whole group down on to me. I liked the diversity of weapons in the game: there weren’t too many different types to choose from in the beginning, but as I explored more and leveled up I started to find different branded weapons and mods to insert at workbenches – either in my spaceship or scattered around in towns and in the wild – that afforded me a customizable arsenal to play with. A Spacer’s Choice Assault Rifle, normally a pretty weak gun, became an electrified death-dealing sniper rifle with a fitted scope and electric mods installed.

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